TODO: Buy a Cinemateket Malmö card today!

Analog film is dying. Digital film is slow in creation. A percent perhaps, of all film, is digitally available. It’s becoming harder to borrow film from archives.
So, not even the places showing old films know how it’s going to be.
Therefore, Malmö’s wonderful film club Cinemateket will sell half-year memberships now. 200 SEK to see all films – in a perfect program – until the end of 2016.
“Stora Cinemateketkortet är ett förmånskort för dig som besöker oss riktigt ofta. Med det går du gratis på våra ordinarie filmvisningar. Stora Cinemateketkortet gäller i ett år och kostar 400 kr. Eftersom vi inte vet hur Cinematekets verksamhet i Malmö kommer att se ut 2017 säljer vi denna höst förmånskort som endast räcker året ut (oavsett när du köper dem). I gengäld säljs de till halva priset.”
Do it!

Pep before PolyConf 2016

I sat down to prepare to get to this year’s PolyConf. I trawled last year’s photos, and found these shots.

(All these photos were taken by polyconf. They’re also All Rights Reserved. So, just links instead of using the awesome paste-a-link-with-oEmbed-support.)

Me having coffee – hair-styling is remarkably difficult in high summer heat.

Will, author of Reasoned Schemer, having coffee sadly, this is the most flattering shot of hime in the collection. The spirited Salt Lake City hacker, whose infectious enthusiasm warmed many conversations was a kind soul and a C64 alumnus. Since then, I’ve bought his book, read half of it, perhaps. It’s mind-bending and kind at the same time. Progress must be slow, as I’m doing this on my own.

Portrait of Robert Virding, author of LFE is tending his language and its community at, a decidedly sub-cultural website. For instance, by translating other people’s blog posts on Erlang to be about LFE. My computer still has an LFE install.

Robert Virding directing Joe Nash (Joe, who presented many a hackathon the world over)

Alban, conf org is a French cinéaste as well as a person who computers a lot

The Bodil birtday cake happened during the closing party

Portrait of Stefan Karpinski, Julia author who’s so genuinely nice that I believe he can run a programming language community. I also believe that community can open “fast execution” to many more people.

Portrait of Leah Hanson, Julia hacker who is working on Learning Julia for O’Reilly (to be published in 2016).

Portrait of Amir, MirageOS hacker who was also kind and nice. This community of communities is incredible like that. See Amir’s homepage and the MirageOS Marrakech Spring 2016 hackathon reports. for more notes and inspirational links.

Portrait of José Valim, Elixir author is someone I never spoke to, but his output is consistent and excellent.

Portrait of Jessica Kerr, functional programming hacker made (and makes) great talks. See her talks page.




Around town in May

Peter visited Malmö, and we sat down to decompress at Simpan.

At Simrishamnsgatan 3
At Simrishamnsgatan 3

A fancy poster for a reading of a book by Swedish genius author Birgitta Stenberg.

A reading circle in Malmö, at Inkonst
A reading circle in Malmö, at Inkonst
For your safety, the sign claims
For your safety, the sign claims


Architecture Decision Records

adr-tools is a set of command-line tools by Nat Pryce that allows people in software projects to record their design decisions, as they go along, a bit like the captain’s log on the Enterprise. (Much more on such log entries at this wiki for trekkers.) You type adr new Use Postgres, and it creates a formatted Markdown file, with headings in place, ready for you to fill out, fleshing out your reasoning for the decision.

Computer book author Michael T. Nygard explains ADR in much more detail in this 2011 blog post. (Book tip: Release It! Nine years old, now. It’s about the things you have in production.)

That library, I had the good fortune to be able to make a Homebrew package (a tap, in the parlance) for it, making installation of the tool a one-liner. This is such a package: homebrew-adr-tools. That’s all there’s to it, just a homebrew-prefixed GitHub repository with that file in it.

I tried adding a feature to the tool, which led me to its outout-expectation-based test suite with its attendant Makefile. Pretty decent experience using them!

Convert character encoding of a CSV file for InDesign Data Merge

InDesign’s Data Merge feature is great. This is a video I return to, when I need to use it.

There is a catch, though: the data must be in the right format for this to work with Swedish text, which has å, ä and ö.

  1. Use a spreadsheet app to make a dataset (columns and rows)
  2. Use column names without spaces, and only lower-case characters. Do not use any “special characters”. So: only between a-z.
  3. Export it to CSV format
  4. Open the Terminal app in your Mac
  5. Change to your directory where the file is by dragging its folder into the Terminal window and hit ENTER.
  6. Type the following text command and press ENTER to change the file filen.csv to the target format (which is called utf-16):
    iconv -f utf-8 -t utf-16 < filen.csv > filen2.csv
  7. A new file filen2.csv is created in the same directory.
  8. Use this new file in your InDesign data merge!

Nerd notes:

  • Typing man iconv will bring up a text manual for the iconv command. Try it! (Quit the manual by typing q.)
  • the < and > are “output redirection” symbols, used in two directions in this so-called pipeline

The manual taught us that the command can be expressed as:

iconv --from-code utf-8 --to-code utf-16 < filen.csv > filen2.csv

This may be easier to read.

  • Changing directory can be done using the text command cd (“change directory”), followed by the path you want to navigate to.
  • pwd is a text command that reads “print working directory”. Try it!

Ruby: Rubocop-friendly Hash pretty-printer

You’re desperate. Your legacy code-generation code outputs a Hash using hash#to_s. You’ve flouted many Rubocop rules to get to where you are. Suddenly, it gets too much. You search the Web for a pretty-print function that you want: a Rubocop-friendly Hash pretty-printer.

Empty-handed, you cough up blood, while a police car’s red-blue lights flicker in through the blinds of your run-down office.


With tired fingers, you type out something like:

Then, you faint, blessed sleep converges on you and envelopes you in a colorless void.

Photo credit: sethw

Finished 2666

I finished reading a novel. Been a long slog. Five years to read a novel? Some blogger said they immediately began re-reading it, to see and experience the rich intertextuality etc. Thanks, Evan, for the reminder that it’s been so long. PS: the book was grand.

IndieWeb clubbery

Tonight, I made it to Homebrew Website Club hosted at inUse in Malmö. I was greeted by three kind souls, among them a proprietor of a Lego fan website with a 176 contributors – and Pelle and Emil.

The club format is the same every time: first an hour of social or at-your-computer time. Then an hour of show-and-tell explanations, demoing and showing stuff.

Emil showed us CSS and SVG techniques, some of them brilliant. SVG is a deep well to drink from. Read more at Sara Soueidan’s website.

Pelle made a very nice hands-on demo of a system of services he’s built, which involved commenting on any page using his telephone.

We had talked about Node.js a fair bit, and I showed what the private caching npm server sinopia looks like when installed. Its claim to fame is its file-based caching – don’t fetch packages from the central repository more than you need.

When I had showed that, we had used up our time, and it was time to put the crisps down and go home. How kind, to have time limit, so that people on tight schedules won’t miss stuff.

On the way out, I asked: “Pelle, do you have a exercise for me to take home?” He responded immediately: “Make your site receive or send WebMentions.”

I look forward to next time.

Aiga forward and left arrow, an example of a random SVG

Git Pre-commit hooks!

Not even once!

Run relevant code-checking tools on your code, before it is even checked in locally. Using the Ruby project Overcommit, you can set this up on your own machine in a jiffy. Or, read more about git hooks.

I took these steps:

  1. Install the overcommit gem in your active Ruby. gem i overcommit
  2. Install overcommit in your system Ruby, using this neat trick:PATH=/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin sudo gem install overcommit – This makes it available to tools like SourceTree! (On committing, it opens a bare shell, without your cool settings.)
  3. In your project directory, where you wish to begin using Overcommit to run Git hooks: overcommit --init
  4. Configure the resulting .overcommit.yml to enable/disable the checks you want run.
  5. Try committing a file which would fail a check.
  6. Profit!

PS: Here is an example .overcommit.yml:

    problem_on_unmodified_line: warn
    enabled: true
    enabled: true